Atheists Get It Wrong Again…Personal Religious Beliefs Prob Don’t Matter, Are Cheap Self-Medication and Who Cares Anyway?

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Firstly, with no free will a medical fact, what ppl say prob has little, if any influence on what they do.  Esp, when the statements involve magical beings, powers and beliefs, like a god, deamons, the tooth fairy.  Our magical minds ‘say” we believe all sorts of silly stuff – mainly silly stuff.  But human behavior is spot-on to the point of there being 7B++.  So silly magical beliefs likely have little impact on everyday behavior – or at least it needs to be rigorously and experimentally tested. Continue reading

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Philosophy is Just More Magical Thinking, Like Voodoo

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The core (false) promise of all magical beliefs is everyday language-based “Mind over matter.”  and “Action at a difference.”  Praying, to some god, is just subjective reports of individual experience.  So is voodoo, belief in the tooth fairy, belief in free will, philosophy, etc.

Well, philosophy is just more of the same.  It presumes that words and everyday language matter to human behavior and explain the world.  Well, it doesn’t and never really has.  But, it is a very popular marketing/sales promise – look at religion!  VERY profitable.   Economists make the same false promise.

Jerry Coyne Gets It Wrong Again and Again…#1: The Atheist’s Fatal Dilemma

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Disclosure:  My comments have been blocked from the Why Evolution Is True Site from the beginnings pretty much.  Also, banned on many other sites and censored on Maestro Pigliucci’s site Scientia Salon, the master himself moderates my comments and requests for me to stop posting occasionally.  All in good humor.

Although I did make a dry ironic comment about JC’s shirt once, I just post on the latest brain science research I read.  That’s it.  I also ask probing questions of other statements.  I am direct and professional at all times, never an ad hominem or intemperate comment – wastes of time.

My experience is that website folks simply cannot tolerate the challenges to cultural and personal myths that just reporting brain research triggers.  Continue reading

Cognitism, Philosophism, Theism and the Cult of Subjectivity

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Brains science, animal ethology and biology have proven our subjective sense of self and Felt experiences, including consciousness, decision making, values, thinking, deciding, etc are mere cultural constructs and myths.  Yet, the Western value of the primacy of individual experience still dominates cultural and academic thinking are work. Continue reading

No “Decision” – “Decision Making”

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This is the model we are buying based on our research.  No room, or need from pretty much all of our subjective experiences and current models of consciousness, choice, value, executive function, self/personality, etc.

“Genuine anger elicits concessions, but fake anger elicits demands.”

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“Genuine anger elicits concessions, but fake anger elicits demands.”

“The findings show that individuals place particularly high demands, are relatively dissatisfied, and have relatively little interest in negotiating again with opponents who surface-act anger, because they have little trust in them,” the researchers conclude. “The same emotion—anger—has opposite consequences on negotiation processes and outcomes depending on … how authentic the display is perceived to be.”

“Put simply, winners don’t punish”

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“Put simply, winners don’t punish,” says co-author David G. Rand of Harvard’s Program for Evolutionary Dynamics and Department of Systems Biology. “Punishment can lead to a downward spiral of retaliation, with destructive outcomes for everybody involved. The people with the highest total payoffs do not use costly punishment.”

The unfortunate tendency of humans to engage in acts of costly punishment must have evolved for other reasons such as establishing dominance hierarchy and defending ownership, but not to promote cooperation. In cooperation games, costly punishment is a detrimental and self-destructive behavior.

“Punishment may be a tool for forcing another person to do what you want,” Dreber says. “It might have been for those kinds of dominance situations that the use of punishment has evolved.”

“Our finding has a very positive message: In an extremely competitive setting, the winners are those who resist the temptation to escalate conflicts, while the losers punish and perish,”