MIT Lecture “Quantifying Uncertainty in Complex Physical Systems:” Modeling Uncertainty

<object classid=”clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000″ codebase=”http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=9,0,0,0&#8243; width=”481″ height=”361″ id=”Main” align=”middle”><param name=”allowScriptAccess” value=”always” /><param name=”movie” value=”http://mitworld.mit.edu/flash/player/Main.swf?host=cp58255.edgefcs.net&flv=mitw-01404-transport-marzouk-complex-sys-12apr2011&preview=http://mitworld.mit.edu//uploads/mitwstill01404transportmarzoukcomplexsys12apr2011.jpg&#8221; /><param name=”quality” value=”high” /><param name=”bgcolor” value=”#000000″ /><embed src=”http://mitworld.mit.edu/flash/player/Main.swf?host=cp58255.edgefcs.net&flv=mitw-01404-transport-marzouk-complex-sys-12apr2011&preview=http://mitworld.mit.edu//uploads/mitwstill01404transportmarzoukcomplexsys12apr2011.jpg&#8221; quality=”high” bgcolor=”#000000″ width=”481″ height=”361″ name=”Main” align=”middle” allowScriptAccess=”always” type=”application/x-shockwave-flash” pluginspage=”http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer&#8221; /></object> “In search of better-burning fuels, or more accurate projections of climate change, researchers inevitably work through multiple models, sometimes at great cost.Youssef Marzouk hopes to provide […]

“About 52 million years ago, primates — an order of animals that includes, among others, humans and great apes — might have stopped foraging alone and banded together in large, loosely formed, same-sex groups to search for food. Then around 16 million years ago, primates began forming more stable social groups, such as male-female pairs and harems dominated by one male, the researchers suggest.”

“If we didn’t have these social groups evolving in primates, we wouldn’t have the scaffolding in place for humans to build upon,” Teaming up this way may have been prompted by a switch from a nocturnal lifestyle to moving about in the sunshine. “Being active during the day would have allowed primates to travel across […]

Do We, Falsely, Overemphasize the Individual as Source of Behavior? Probably

“What we learned is that when it comes to the brain and cooperation, the whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts,” says Eric Fortune, associate professor of psychological and brain sciences at Johns Hopkins University. “We found that the brain of each individual participant prefers the combined activity over his or her own part.” […]

Yes, Bacteria Do “Talk” — Signal, Actually

Quorum sensing is a system of stimulus and response correlated to population density. Many species of bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate  gene expression according to the density of their local population. In similar fashion, some social insects use quorum sensing to determine where to nest. In addition to its function in biological systems, quorum sensing has several useful applications for computing […]